Windy weather wallpaper not updating. Creating a JavaScript Clock.



Windy weather wallpaper not updating

Windy weather wallpaper not updating

Intermediate Published on 20 February Categories: Along the way, you take a look at how to access text nodes in the DOM, and how to set an onLoad event handler.

One of the great things about JavaScript is that it lets you manipulate the contents of a Web page in real-time. This means that we can use JavaScript to create a digital clock, embedded in the Web page, that updates every second.

This article shows you how to do just that. Getting the current time If we want to create a clock then obviously we need to retrieve the current time. We can do this via JavaScript's Date class. First, we create a new Date object with no parameters, which gives us a Date object containing the current date and time on the visitor's computer: We want it to be in the format "HH: First we'll add a leading zero to the minutes and seconds values, if required: This is a special operator that returns the value before the colon if the condition before the query?

It's a great way to write an if block in shorthand, provided you only need to return a single value. Next we'll set a variable, timeOfDay, to "AM" or "PM" as appropriate, and subtract 12 from the hours component, if required, to convert it to hour format.

We'd also like the hours component to show 12 rather than 0, so we need to add a check for this too: To do this, we first create a span container in the markup to hold the time display: We can then populate the container with our time string by retrieving this child text node then setting its nodeValue property, as follows: We've wrapped all the above code in a JavaScript function, updateClock: For more on setInterval, see our tutorial on setTimeout and setInterval. We should also call updateClock at the moment the page loads, so that the clock appears straightaway: You can see the clock in action on this demo page.

We've also added some CSS to the clock container to make it prettier. Feel free to use any of the above JavaScript code to make a clock for your own website. You might like to try putting the various time components in separate span containers, so that you can style them individually.

You could also try converting the code to display a hour clock instead.

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Windy Weather LWP for Samsung Galaxy S4 mini



Windy weather wallpaper not updating

Intermediate Published on 20 February Categories: Along the way, you take a look at how to access text nodes in the DOM, and how to set an onLoad event handler.

One of the great things about JavaScript is that it lets you manipulate the contents of a Web page in real-time. This means that we can use JavaScript to create a digital clock, embedded in the Web page, that updates every second.

This article shows you how to do just that. Getting the current time If we want to create a clock then obviously we need to retrieve the current time.

We can do this via JavaScript's Date class. First, we create a new Date object with no parameters, which gives us a Date object containing the current date and time on the visitor's computer: We want it to be in the format "HH: First we'll add a leading zero to the minutes and seconds values, if required: This is a special operator that returns the value before the colon if the condition before the query?

It's a great way to write an if block in shorthand, provided you only need to return a single value. Next we'll set a variable, timeOfDay, to "AM" or "PM" as appropriate, and subtract 12 from the hours component, if required, to convert it to hour format. We'd also like the hours component to show 12 rather than 0, so we need to add a check for this too: To do this, we first create a span container in the markup to hold the time display: We can then populate the container with our time string by retrieving this child text node then setting its nodeValue property, as follows: We've wrapped all the above code in a JavaScript function, updateClock: For more on setInterval, see our tutorial on setTimeout and setInterval.

We should also call updateClock at the moment the page loads, so that the clock appears straightaway: You can see the clock in action on this demo page. We've also added some CSS to the clock container to make it prettier. Feel free to use any of the above JavaScript code to make a clock for your own website. You might like to try putting the various time components in separate span containers, so that you can style them individually.

You could also try converting the code to display a hour clock instead.

Windy weather wallpaper not updating

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5 Comments

  1. It's a great way to write an if block in shorthand, provided you only need to return a single value. We should also call updateClock at the moment the page loads, so that the clock appears straightaway: We can then populate the container with our time string by retrieving this child text node then setting its nodeValue property, as follows:

  2. This means that we can use JavaScript to create a digital clock, embedded in the Web page, that updates every second. One of the great things about JavaScript is that it lets you manipulate the contents of a Web page in real-time. We've wrapped all the above code in a JavaScript function, updateClock:

  3. You can see the clock in action on this demo page. For more on setInterval, see our tutorial on setTimeout and setInterval.

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