Physical sexual and psychological abuse in high school dating relationships. Secure Connection Failed.



Physical sexual and psychological abuse in high school dating relationships

Physical sexual and psychological abuse in high school dating relationships

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Background Prior longitudinal studies have shown high cumulative dating violence exposure rates among U.

We used a method similar to the timeline follow-back interview to query adolescents about dating violence victimization from age 13 to 19—including dating violence types physical, sexual, and psychological , frequency, age at first occurrence, and number of abusive partners. Methods A total of subjects were randomly sampled from university registrar records and invited to complete an online survey, which utilized methods similar to the timeline follow-back interview, to retrospectively assess relationship histories and dating violence victimization from age 13 to 19 eight questions adapted from widely-used surveys covering physical, sexual, and psychological abuse.

Then, for each dating violence type, we asked about the number of occurrences, number of abusive partners, and age at first occurrence. Of subjects who completed the survey, we included 64 percent females; 36 percent males who had a dating partner from age 13 to More than one-third of abused females had two or more abusive partners: Males also had two or more abusive partners, as follows: Among abused females, Among males, for most abuse types, 16 percent to 30 percent of victimization began before age Conclusions Our study adds information to a substantial, but still growing, body of literature about dating violence frequency, age of occurrence, and number of abusive partners among adolescents.

These studies have generally shown a gender symmetry trend for psychological and physical types of dating violence among adolescents. Regarding sexual violence victimization, findings from cross-sectional studies have shown that sexual violence victimization rates tend to be higher among adolescent females 8.

In addition to these studies, within the context of longitudinal intervention studies aimed at reducing dating violence, Foshee and colleagues showed that dating violence victimization could be reduced in males and females up to four years after the intervention was delivered [ 21 ]. In sum, these longitudinal studies were instrumental in adding to our understanding of how and when physical and sexual types of violence occur. In addition to the high prevalence of dating violence among adolescents shown in U.

Teens from racial and ethnic minority groups may be at disproportional risk for experiencing health burdens due to victimization. A study of 8, predominantly African American and Hispanic teens recruited from New York City high schools showed that dating violence victimization was among the top risk factors for females making a suicide attempt 61 percent more likely than non-victimized females [ 5 ].

In the present investigation, we used a method similar to the timeline follow-back interview to query adolescents about their experiences of dating violence from age 13 to 19—including dating violence types, frequency, age at first occurrence, and number of abusive partners. The timeline follow-back assessment method has been widely used in studies to retrospectively capture at risk behaviors, such as drug and alcohol use, among adolescents [ 22 - 24 ].

We adapted the method to capture both relationship and dating violence histories in a sample of college students. The Institute of Medicine report — Preventing Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Disorders Among Young People — called for a critical focus on the prevention of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders in young people [ 26 ].

Given that dating violence has been associated with mental and behavioral health issues that may be a result of the violence or a contributing factor to it, our study attempted to provide additional information about dating violence among adolescents spanning age 13 to 19, including the number of times they experienced the dating violence, the age they first experienced it, and number of abusive partners.

Methods Data for the study were collected as part of a feasibility study for testing the study questionnaire. Two follow-up reminders were sent by email, three and seven days after the initial email, reminding students to complete the survey. The overall response rate at each recruitment email was as follows: The response rate for the study was relatively low Namely, first, to establish relationship histories [ 29 - 38 ], subjects were asked whether they had a dating, romantic or sexual partner between age 13 and They were then asked specific details about their three most recent partners, starting with their most recent partner, that is, the partner they were last involved with between age 13 and Similar to the timeline follow-back interview method, we used memory prompts, such as asking the subject to remember the year they were in high school to facilitate recall of the age that a relationship began and ended.

After we asked subjects these detailed questions about their three most recent partners, we asked about the total number of partners subjects had beyond the three most recent partnerships from age 13 to

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Physical sexual and psychological abuse in high school dating relationships

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Background Prior longitudinal studies have shown high cumulative dating violence exposure rates among U. We used a method similar to the timeline follow-back interview to query adolescents about dating violence victimization from age 13 to 19—including dating violence types physical, sexual, and psychological , frequency, age at first occurrence, and number of abusive partners.

Methods A total of subjects were randomly sampled from university registrar records and invited to complete an online survey, which utilized methods similar to the timeline follow-back interview, to retrospectively assess relationship histories and dating violence victimization from age 13 to 19 eight questions adapted from widely-used surveys covering physical, sexual, and psychological abuse. Then, for each dating violence type, we asked about the number of occurrences, number of abusive partners, and age at first occurrence.

Of subjects who completed the survey, we included 64 percent females; 36 percent males who had a dating partner from age 13 to More than one-third of abused females had two or more abusive partners: Males also had two or more abusive partners, as follows: Among abused females, Among males, for most abuse types, 16 percent to 30 percent of victimization began before age Conclusions Our study adds information to a substantial, but still growing, body of literature about dating violence frequency, age of occurrence, and number of abusive partners among adolescents.

These studies have generally shown a gender symmetry trend for psychological and physical types of dating violence among adolescents. Regarding sexual violence victimization, findings from cross-sectional studies have shown that sexual violence victimization rates tend to be higher among adolescent females 8. In addition to these studies, within the context of longitudinal intervention studies aimed at reducing dating violence, Foshee and colleagues showed that dating violence victimization could be reduced in males and females up to four years after the intervention was delivered [ 21 ].

In sum, these longitudinal studies were instrumental in adding to our understanding of how and when physical and sexual types of violence occur. In addition to the high prevalence of dating violence among adolescents shown in U. Teens from racial and ethnic minority groups may be at disproportional risk for experiencing health burdens due to victimization. A study of 8, predominantly African American and Hispanic teens recruited from New York City high schools showed that dating violence victimization was among the top risk factors for females making a suicide attempt 61 percent more likely than non-victimized females [ 5 ].

In the present investigation, we used a method similar to the timeline follow-back interview to query adolescents about their experiences of dating violence from age 13 to 19—including dating violence types, frequency, age at first occurrence, and number of abusive partners.

The timeline follow-back assessment method has been widely used in studies to retrospectively capture at risk behaviors, such as drug and alcohol use, among adolescents [ 22 - 24 ].

We adapted the method to capture both relationship and dating violence histories in a sample of college students. The Institute of Medicine report — Preventing Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Disorders Among Young People — called for a critical focus on the prevention of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders in young people [ 26 ].

Given that dating violence has been associated with mental and behavioral health issues that may be a result of the violence or a contributing factor to it, our study attempted to provide additional information about dating violence among adolescents spanning age 13 to 19, including the number of times they experienced the dating violence, the age they first experienced it, and number of abusive partners.

Methods Data for the study were collected as part of a feasibility study for testing the study questionnaire. Two follow-up reminders were sent by email, three and seven days after the initial email, reminding students to complete the survey. The overall response rate at each recruitment email was as follows: The response rate for the study was relatively low Namely, first, to establish relationship histories [ 29 - 38 ], subjects were asked whether they had a dating, romantic or sexual partner between age 13 and They were then asked specific details about their three most recent partners, starting with their most recent partner, that is, the partner they were last involved with between age 13 and Similar to the timeline follow-back interview method, we used memory prompts, such as asking the subject to remember the year they were in high school to facilitate recall of the age that a relationship began and ended.

After we asked subjects these detailed questions about their three most recent partners, we asked about the total number of partners subjects had beyond the three most recent partnerships from age 13 to

Physical sexual and psychological abuse in high school dating relationships

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2 Comments

  1. In the above study, researchers found that girls who experienced both physical and sexual dating violence were almost twice as likely to attempt suicide as those who experience one or the other, and boys who experienced both were almost three times as likely.

  2. For victims of abuse, the effects of these types of violent actions, often long-lasting, can include depression and anxiety disorders, substance abuse , eating disorders, risky sexual behavior, and even suicide attempts. Similar to the timeline follow-back interview method, we used memory prompts, such as asking the subject to remember the year they were in high school to facilitate recall of the age that a relationship began and ended.

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